UA Mineral Museum New Exhibit
American Mineral Heritage: The Harvard Collection

Come and behold this spectacular selection of minerals from the Mineralogical & Geological Museum at Harvard University, a world-renowned collection of gems and minerals that has never been seen before in Arizona! “American Mineral Heritage: The Harvard Collection,” on display at the Flandrau Science Center and Planetarium, includes a trove of stunning, historic specimens – rare golds, outstanding azurites, eye-popping tourmalines – that are notable not only for their sheer beauty, but also for their historical significance. Don’t miss this rare opportunity.

Welcome to the University of Arizona Mineral Museum

The Museum is dedicated to providing public education and the preservation of minerals and meteorites while also serving the research needs of professionals, students and collectors. The collection is world-wide in scope, but with specific emphasis on minerals from Arizona and Mexico.

Funded through Flandrau Science Center & Planetarium, and sponsored in part by Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold, Inc. and the Tucson Gem and Mineral Society

American Mineral Heritage: The Harvard Collection

February 8th, 2016

This new special exhibit, “American Mineral Heritage: The Harvard Collection,” produced by the Mineralogical & Geological Museum at Harvard University (MGMH) in collaboration with the UA Mineral Museum, will debut at the Flandrau Science Center and Planetarium on Saturday, February 6, 2016. The exhibit features an exquisite selection of minerals from Harvard’s collection, the oldest […]

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Meet the Trilobites

February 22nd, 2015

Meet the Trilobites – Arizona’s First Inhabitants Long before the dinosaurs ruled the earth, the trilobites ruled the seas. Ancient relatives of lobsters and horseshoe crabs, trilobites flourished in the warm seas that covered much of Arizona millions of years ago. “Meet the Trilobites – Arizona’s First Inhabitants,” the new exhibit at the Flandrau Science […]

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About Litharge


The mineral litharge, chemical formula PbO, forms when lead ores such as galena oxidize. It gets its name from the Greek word lithargyros, for rock silver, because the mineral was produced when metallurgists separated silver from lead ores. It was first named in 1917, though its existence has likely been known for nearly 2000 years.